Equifax statement dumping its CEO is a mass of weaselly mush


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First, always be suspicious of adverbs. This short release (658 words) includes deeply, totally, intensely, and sincerely, all in the second paragraph. Any one of these is an unequivocal indicator of bullshit. The Equifax PR playbook apparently includes the principle: “When you have nothing substantive to say, use adverbs to say it with feeling.”

The complete article

Without Bullshit

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How Facebook makes money for me — and why that worries me


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I have not been on Facebook since last 3 years. Sometimes, I do think if I am cutting myself off from lot of stuff that is happening out there and might be helpful to me. In today’s needull, Josh Bernoff gives a fairly detailed breakup of how he earns money. He discusses how Facebook is becoming increasingly important and why is he worried.

After Google, it became a lot easier to find things. As a result, everyone with something to say or share put it on the Web. Google transformed our experience, because it determined so much of what we see and read. Google attempted to be evenhanded about what it was doing, using what were supposed to be unbiased algorithms, and it did not change the underlying content it linked to.

Now Facebook increasingly determines what we see. It has added key improvements to the experience: connections with people we know about, a great mobile app, and crucially, an algorithm that shapes our perceptions. But unlike Google, Facebook is not attempting to be evenhanded. It shows you what it thinks you want to see, whether or not that’s what you ought to see — and regardless of whether what you read is true.

The complete article

Josh Bernoff — Without Bullshit

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