Ten photos that changed how we see human rights


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Often, the power of seeing someone very different from ourselves can create a sense of proximity, and the recognition of another’s full humanity. For example, after Frederick Douglass escaped from slavery in Maryland in 1838, he became a leading campaigner in the abolitionist movement in the United States. He believed in the power of his dignified and serious photographic portrait to counter racist caricatures, and became the most-photographed man of the 19th century.

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The Conversation

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Do women really go for ‘bad boys’? Here’s the science that settles the question


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Women, do you agree?

And there may be all sorts of other reasons why some people end up dating “bad people”. They may be repeating patterns of behaviour they’ve become used to in past relationships or they may find the world of dating stressful and end up making bad decisions. Or they may simply have bought into myths of dating and behave accordingly. But, for the most part, the evidence suggests that both women and men prefer nice partners and are turned off by jerks.

The problem with the nice-guys-finish-last stereotype, aside from going against the grain of years of scientific evidence, is that it may compromise the possibility of forming meaningful relationships. Perpetuating this myth not only creates unhelpful expectations about how we should behave, but trying to live up to the myth can sometimes damage relationships.

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The Conversation

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When algorithm denies you service


If you deny an applicant a loan because of his credit score you need to send to customer his credit report along with stating the reason of rejection. The customer can look at report and see why his credit score is low. If there is any discrepancy, he can contest. Also, he can make some corrective actions to improve his score like paying off an existing loan.

Given that we are transitioning into a world where algorithms are making decisions to deny you a service, it becomes important that the consumer understands why he was denied a service. The customer needs to be explained in simple terms what were the reasons his service request was denied. The customer should have the opportunity to contest any discrepancy and also should have opportunity to take corrective actions.

Seems there is some progress on this front.

In May 2018, the new European Union General Data Protection Regulation takes effect, including a section giving people a right to get an explanation for automated decisions that affect their lives.

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Anupam Datta – The Conversation

How fair is it for just three people to receive the Nobel Prize in physics?


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The article raises some pertinent questions regarding collaboration in science and the restriction to award a maximum of 3 only.

When publishing any scientific article, there is a basic conundrum – someone must receive the prime place on the list of authors. In some fields, authors covet the first place; in others, the last place. And the benefits of being the primary author go far beyond a single article. There’s a phenomenon called the “Matthew Effect” in science, referring to the observation in the Gospel of Matthew that the “rich get richer.” The noted author of an article is much more likely to receive attention into the future.

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Caroline Wagner — The Conversation

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More people than ever before are single – and that’s a good thing


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This is for my single friends and specially for those who have decided to stay single for life. This needull makes some valid points on why some people deciding to stay single is actually good for the society.

In some significant ways, it’s the single people who are doing particularly well.

For example, people with more diversified relationship portfolios tend to be more satisfied with their lives. In contrast, the insularity of couples who move in together or get married can leave them vulnerable to poorer mental health.

Studies have shown that people who stay single develop more confidence in their own opinions and undergo more personal growth and development than people who marry. For example, they value meaningful work more than married people do. They may also have more opportunities to enjoy the solitude that many of them savor.

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Bella DePaulo — The Conversation

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