Countering Russian Information Operations in the Age of Social Media


421591322e1442c1

Social media platforms such as Twitter and Facebook have an important role to play in mitigating the effects of Russian messaging, but their primary objective is generating profits, not defending Western political systems. Attempts to introduce legislation or regulations to restrict online speech, even if they were targeted at Russian disinformation and trolls, could mirror Russian constraints on free expression and could be interpreted as running counter to the values Western societies seek to defend. Nevertheless, tech platforms have an interest in taking firm steps to prevent, for example, the hijacking of profiles of legitimate organizations and individuals for the purpose of disinformation. They also have an interest in cooperating with Western intelligence agencies, as this could provide them with greater understanding of how their systems are abused to systematically deceive their users, as well as of software bugs and other technical vulnerabilities in their products.

The complete article

Council on Foreign Relations

Image source

Advertisements

A lower nuclear threshold


dr-2bstrangelove2bor2b-2bhow2bi2blearned2bto2bstop2bworrying2band2blove2bthe2bbomb2b-2bamerican2bposter2bby2btomi2bungerer2b3

A slightly older article, but pertinent to our times. As the writer rightly says, we should probably start worrying about the bomb again.

The possibility of a nuclear weapon being used in anger for the first time since 1945 is still, mercifully, extremely remote. But in 2017 the chances of it happening can no longer be discounted entirely. The inconvenient truth is that nuclear weapons are a greater danger now than at any time since the end of the cold war. The risks—from geopolitical miscalculation or from rogue actors, whether a state or terrorists—today exceed those of the late 20th century.

The complete article

Matthew Symonds — The Economist

Image source