The partition goes on: A Pakistani perspective


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A Pakistani perspective.

Twenty years on, I feel we had underplayed the whole thing. When I hear about another beef lynching in India, I am reminded of all those old men who boasted about throwing a pig’s head into a mosque or slaughtering a cow in the middle of a Hindu festival.

And I think of my own beloved country we carved out of India to protect our liberties. And where we don’t have to cower in fear of a Hindu or Sikh mob.

We can get lynched by our fellow Pakistani classmates for quoting a bit of poetry and questioning some fragment of a religious text.

The partition goes on in slow motion. I took a flight back from India after the 2008 Mumbai attacks.

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Mohammed Hanif — Al Jazeera

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How a jacket and a briefcase shaped a partition love story


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Human stories emanating from human created tragedies.

In March 1948, the two got married. It was an austere ceremony; both families were struggling to pick up the pieces.

Ms Kaur wore her favourite jacket. Mr Maini got together his certificates and papers from his briefcase to start a new life: he joined the judicial service in Punjab, got a small house in compensation and moved to Ludhiana with Ms Kaur.

The couple had two children, who both served as civil servants. Mr Maini died some 30 years ago; Ms Kaur died in 2002.

“The jacket and the briefcase,” says Ms Maini, “are testimony to the life they lost and found together.”

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Soutik Biswas — BBC

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