Too Harvard To Fail


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Interesting to note that Harvard’s $37.1billion endowment is bigger than half the world’s economies.

But on the second point, Harvard has floundered, turning in consistently “disappointing” endowment returns with material consequences across the University. Harvard Management Company, the University’s investment arm tasked with growing the endowment, has been forced to undergo some institutional soul-searching after years of falling behind peer institutions: This year, the gap between Harvard’s and Yale’s endowments narrowed to within $10 billion.

The complete article

Dianne Lee & Michael E. XieThe Harvard Crimson

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Why Employers Favor Men


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The researchers wanted to take a closer look at the source of this gender divide, so they used online experiments to probe two types of gender discrimination:

  • Statistical discrimination, which is rooted in beliefs about average gender differences in abilities or skills.

  • Taste-based discrimination, which is driven by stereotypes, favoritism for one group, and a bias against another group.

The complete article

What Makes Us Happy?


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This one is a masterpiece of an article. A 72 year experiment at Harvard, following the lives of 268 men to find the answer to the elusive question – What makes us happy? This is a 2009 article but definitely timeless.

Case No. 218

How’s this for the good life? You’re rich, and you made the dough yourself. You’re well into your 80s, and have spent hardly a day in the hospital. Your wife had a cancer scare, but she’s recovered and by your side, just as she’s been for more than 60 years. Asked to rate the marriage on a scale of 1 to 9, where 1 is perfectly miserable and 9 is perfectly happy, you circle the highest number. You’ve got two good kids, grandkids too. A survey asks you: “If you had your life to live over again, what problem, if any, would you have sought help for and to whom would you have gone?” “Probably I am fooling myself,” you write, “but I don’t think I would want to change anything.” If only we could take what you’ve done, reduce it to a set of rules, and apply it systematically.

Right?

The complete article

Joshua Wolf Shenk — The Atlantic

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