Asian-Americans on being “likable” in the modern workplace


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On navigating racial stereotypes:

The stereotype that I run into the most with my own race is looking young. I was 27 and had just started a new job, and I was introduced to the team as a new person. One older woman said to me, “I don’t mean to sound ageist, but you don’t look like you’ve graduated from college.” It was like, what was the purpose of making that statement? I’m telling you that I have.The implication that I might be in school signals that I might be less than professional.

For Asian-American men, the leading stereotypes are being good at math and being good with computers. But when you narrow that down to East Asian men, you are also pegged as quiet, shy, and for many, socially awkward. I had a conversation with a friend who was categorized as being “stoic and unexpressive” even though I know him to be a very funny, likable person. If your communication skills are not that strong, it’s easy for people not to talk very much.

The complete article

PAVITHRA MOHAN AND ANISA PURBASARI HORTON — Fast Company

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Is your country ready for a catastrophe?


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How ready is your country to face a massive change? Today’s needull looks at this critical aspect.

Stiles compares the experience of Haiti in 2010 with Chile, which experienced an 8.8-magnitude earthquake soon after. More than 90% of Chile’s population lost power and thousands of homes were destroyed by a tsunami. But, within three months, the country’s stock market and consumer confidence was back to pre-disaster levels, and economic growth seemed unaffected, he says. Haiti, by contrast, had a loss of more than 5% of GDP in 2010. “Haiti struggled to rebound from the earthquake, hampered by weak government structures, poorly coordinated humanitarian response and loss of key personnel,” he says. Haiti now stands at 123rd in the index, compared to Chile’s 24th place ranking.
Though the top performers are all rich countries, several lower and middle-income nations punch above their weight. Rwanda, officially a “low income” country, is in 46th place ahead of high-income economies like Greece (54th) and plenty of upper middle- and lower-middle-income countries, including Turkey and Mexico.