The Podcast Business Model


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Is Luminary going to be Netflix of podcast?

This is a natural evolution of the podcast model. Podcasts began as free content for, you guessed it, iPods. The idea is that the content could be ‘cast’ to the ‘pod.’ In fact, today, podcasts may be the only linguistic use of the ‘pod’ term left (well if you don’t count Tide). Those podcasts then got ads and then it turned out that the ads were effective which was great news for startups like Gimlet that had built themselves off a long tradition in audio content, including innovative ads, brought about by This American Life.  (Gimlet was recently acquired by Spotify for a purported $200m).

The complete article

Joshua Gans — Digitopoly

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It is far from clear that requiring payments for data makes sense


Should we get paid for our data?

Herein lies the insight: to the extent that having consumers not be paid for their data is an indication that they value the use of their data by the network, by forcing the network to pay for that data, the consumer can be made worse off because they can no longer just give the data to the network. Thus, the whole analogy with slavery or the supply of pure labour breaks down because the consumer may want to encourage the network to make use of more of its data. Requiring the network to pay subverts that process.

In order for the notion of regulating payments for data makes sense, you have to believe that consumers do not gain utility by giving additional data to networks. Some (and perhaps many) consumers do give their data freely to networks now. Thus, it is entirely possible that they will be made worse off it networks are required to pay them for that data because those networks may structure themselves to no longer make use of the data rather than pay for it.

The complete article

Joshua Gans — Digitopoly

Is Tesla disruptive?


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The writer of the needull argues that Tesla is not disruptive.

The framework asks 5 questions:

  1. Does the product target over-served customers (i.e., with better value for money) or create a new market?
  2. Does the disruptor have incentives to enter higher performance segments while incumbents retreat?
  3. Does it have a trajectory for fast, across the board, performance improvements?
  4. Does it create a new value network (e.g., sales channel)?
  5. Does it disrupt ALL incumbents?

The answers to these are apparently: no, no, yes, yes and no. That leads Bartman to conclude that Tesla’s products are likely sustaining rather than disruptive.

The complete article

Joshua Gans — Digitopoly

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