Calling your husband by name for the first time


p059x51h

This needull is very close to home. My mother and many other women in India have never called their husband by name. But, things are changing.

 

When speaking to us children, she always referred to him as “babuji” – the Hindi word for “father” that we used. When addressing him directly, she always said “Hey ho”, which means roughly “Hey you”.

As teenagers when we became aware of the fact, we made fun of her. We tried to trick her into saying his name just once. But she never did.

The complete article

Geeta Pandey — BBC Magazine

Image source

The rise and fall of the Bombshell Bandit


mug-shot

The teaser is out for Simran – a new Bollywood movie. The movie is based on the real life exploits of Sandeep Kaur. “At just five feet three inches tall, the slender Indian nurse did not boast the muscle of typical bank robbers. She had no weapon or getaway driver. Instead she gripped a hurriedly written note that read: TICK TOCK. I HAVE A BOMB.”

When they suggested bank robbery, Kaur says the idea didn’t seem ludicrous. “It’s do or die. If I did this, and anything did happen then at least the police would be involved,” she reasons. “Or you know, I could just kill myself.” But why didn’t she just tell the police? “Ever since we were kids we had to lie,” she says. From the punishment she suffered at the hands of her parents, to partying, and her parents’ divorce, anything shameful had to be hidden.

The complete story

BBC Magazine

Image source

Teaser of the movie “Simran”

How a jacket and a briefcase shaped a partition love story


68

Human stories emanating from human created tragedies.

In March 1948, the two got married. It was an austere ceremony; both families were struggling to pick up the pieces.

Ms Kaur wore her favourite jacket. Mr Maini got together his certificates and papers from his briefcase to start a new life: he joined the judicial service in Punjab, got a small house in compensation and moved to Ludhiana with Ms Kaur.

The couple had two children, who both served as civil servants. Mr Maini died some 30 years ago; Ms Kaur died in 2002.

“The jacket and the briefcase,” says Ms Maini, “are testimony to the life they lost and found together.”

The complete article

Soutik Biswas — BBC

Image source

The women who invented the Brazilian wax


7513216598_81555a6c1d_b

This is the story of how the Brazilian wax came to be.

Their signature wax had been invented by their sister Janea. “It’s a funny story actually,” says Malin. Back in the late ’70s Janea was in Bahia with her husband, having a beer and some fried fish on the beach. She was admiring a beautiful girl, but as she walked past Janea was horrified by the pubic hair protruding from the back of her tiny bikini. “The image – it was like a mirror that shattered,” says Malin.

Janea’s next thought was: “Wow, do we have hair there?”

At home her suspicion was confirmed. But when she went to a salon to have it removed, she met with resistance: “Are you crazy? I’m not touching you there,” was the response.

So Janea decided to do it herself.

The complete article

Vibeke Venema — BBC Magazine

Image source

Death from overwork


overwork

Today’s needull talks about karoshi, which means death by overwork in Japanese. By 2015, there were 2310 claims of death by overwork. This phenomenon might be spreading to emerging countries like China and India too where there is a culture of presentee-ism.

Intriguingly, karoshi might not be caused by stress or a lack of sleep, but time spent in the office. By analysing the habits and health records of more than 600,000 people, last year researchers found that those who worked a 55-hour week were a third more likely to suffer a stroke than those working fewer than 40 hours. It’s not known why, but the authors speculated it might simply be the result long periods sat at a desk.

The complete article

Zaria Gorvett — BBC

Image source