Beyond ‘litti chokha’


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Sunday special on Bihari cuisine.

“Bihar is very rich (in food), but it has been looked down upon due to multiple political reasons. Therefore, its cuisine got left behind as well. Look at Bengal, for example, whose food has really travelled,” says chef and food consultant Ajay Chopra, who has made some Bihari dishes on his show Northern Flavours on the Living Foodz channel. He calls the thekua, made during the annual festival of Chhath, no less scrumptious than a Scottish shortbread. In modern kitchens, fans of the fennel-flavoured thekua often bake it instead of frying it. Chopra went a step further to fashion a bold thekua millefeuille, putting a French spin on it, for a food event recently. Another favourite of his is the Bihari murmura mutton—cooked with a lot of mustard oil and turmeric, spooned over puffed rice and topped with chopped onion, green chillies and lemon.

The complete article

Neha Bhatt — Mint

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The Palm Oil Problem


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Organizations like Rainforest Rescue have demanded a boycott of palm oil, urging consumers to use local oils made from sunflower seeds or rapeseed instead. As of December 2014, the European Union has made such a boycott easier by requiring foodstuff producers to clearly indicate what kind of oil is used in their product. If consumers begin shunning palm oil, the drop in demand will have an influence on its global price, which will in turn affect the prices producers receive at the local level.

The complete article

Vanessa Steinmetz and Karl Vandenhole — Spiegel

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A HISTORY OF MANILA IN 9 DISHES


A food article for your Sunday!

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ADOBO AT PURPLE YAM (RESTAURANT IN MALATE OR KIOSK IN ESTANCIA MALL, CAPITOL COMMONS)

Amy Besa, owner of Purple Yam in Brooklyn and Manila, also a self-described Manileña, makes her adobo with apple cider vinegar because that’s what was available in her city supermarkets growing up. A recipe from her book Memories of Philippine Kitchens uses baby back ribs and replaces the peppercorns with tellicherry peppers. She shared her recipe with the New York Times, where it maintains a perfect five-star rating from hundreds of homesick Filipinos.

The complete article

Roads & Kingdoms

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What caused Cape Town’s water crisis?


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A sign of times to come when cities start running out of water.

While within the Mother City a blame game seems to be the only way for politicians to attempt to absolve themselves of direct responsibility, the truth is that the looming Day Zero has a host of geneses. And, given these multiple causes, there should be little surprise as to the pending crisis.

Firstly, South Africa’s budget planning is myopically short-term. The country has lurched from election cycle to election cycle as both national and local spheres attempt to plug the deep holes in social expenditure and exclusion. Politically, elected office bearers regard this as providing immediate benefits to the poor and in return, expecting electoral rewards at the polls.

The complete article

Daniel Silke — Fin24

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The Story of World Central Kitchen, the Nonprofit Serving Millions of Meals to Puerto Rico


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Inspiring.

In Puerto Rico, it’s worked. Since arriving to the devastated island in September, World Central Kitchen served more than 2.3 million meals and fed more people than any other organization on the ground, with the help of dozens of chefs and hundreds of other volunteers. But disaster relief is actually new for World Central Kitchen, and prior to this year the nonprofit focused on its mission to create smart solutions to hunger and poverty through other initiatives.

The complete article

Monica Burton — Eater

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The Eater Guide to the Whole Entire World


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Being a foodie, this is something I had to share. Great recommendations from all over the world.

Tapas at the bar in Barcelona, perfect roast goose in Hong Kong, dinner in a vineyard outside Melbourne, and brunch on a terrace in São Paulo — when we travel now, we travel to eat. But global restaurant-hopping goes beyond that perfect iconic essential dish: Restaurants and bars are an opportunity to slip into daily life and experience a city’s unique rhythm. We tapped dozens of local experts to open the doors to the best, the coolest, the weirdest, the most inspiring culinary experiences a traveler can have — in short, these maps are exactly what we want to have at our fingertips when we step off a plane.

The complete guide

Eater

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This Tiny Country Feeds the World


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Could not help but share this great piece from National Geographic about a small country doing wonders with its sustainable farming practices.

Seen from the air, the Netherlands resembles no other major food producer—a fragmented patchwork of intensely cultivated fields, most of them tiny by agribusiness standards, punctuated by bustling cities and suburbs. In the country’s principal farming regions, there’s almost no potato patch, no greenhouse, no hog barn that’s out of sight of skyscrapers, manufacturing plants, or urban sprawl. More than half the nation’s land area is used for agriculture and horticulture.

The complete article

Frank Viviano — National Geographic

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