Revisiting Taxi Driver in the Age of the Mass Shooter


maxresdefault

Nice article discussing the relevance of Taxi Driver is these times of lone wolf mass shootings. There are some differences.

But there is one critical difference between Travis and real-life shooters. The film, as it molds Travis into a killer, asks us to understand, even empathize with him. His motivations are not as clear as Dylann Roof’s racism or the Pulse nightclub shooter’s homophobia. Travis doesn’t blame one particular group for the filth and depravity of Times Square in the 1970s. Corruption is everywhere. We see it through his eyes: gangs throwing trash at his cab, couples using the back seat as they would a cheap motel. When he finally decides to use his guns, it’s not to massacre innocents, but save one, a prepubescent sex worker named Iris (Jodie Foster).

The complete article

Douglas Markowitz — Miami New Times

Image source

The weirdness of David Lynch


6212cc539889223

You don’t understand David Lynch creations. Period. But, they just refuse to leave your mind for a long time. Twin Peaks is making a comeback and so Lynch fans like me are waiting for something strange and unexpected.

You’ll find there’s no one single way to characterize what goes on in a Lynch film – all attempts sound a lot like creative-writing exercises trying to describe the interior state of a hallucinating psychotic. Starting at the beginning, with Eraserhead (1977), is like grabbing an alligator by the nose, but there it is: from nowhere, during the Carter administration no less, Lynch birthed out what might be the most ingenuously strange American film ever made. We’ve been trying to articulate what the hell this cult oddity is ever since, from the wailing mutant baby to the Lady in the Radiator, and somehow we’re right back where we started, wondering when the mere suffocation of dream logic ends and Lynch’s one-of-a-kind perspective on stuff begins.

The complete article

Michale Atkinson — Rolling Stone

Image source

Business is not politics


trump-ap_17

John Kay brings amazing insights in his writings. This article explains why a businessman might not be suited for politics. Simple and lucid.

The most important function of a chief executive is to build a strong and supportive management team.  The ability of a political leader to do this is seriously circumscribed, because many others also enjoy democratic legitimacy. They are also elected, and they hold positions of power conferred by their party positions.  This leads to dysfunctionality in leadership, as individuals who would not have chosen each other and more or less openly covet each other’s roles must work together: neither Donald Trump nor Paul Ryan would have selected the other for the role each occupies.

The complete article

John Kay

Image source

Why Do Men Play and Watch Sports?


o-watching-american-football-on-tv-facebook

Have you ever wondered why do you like to watch men running after a football? Why do you find sports exciting? As always, the answer might lie with our evolution.

In sum, there are reasons to believe that in ancestral human societies, young men, who faced the problem of gaining reproductive access to the reproductive capacity of the opposite sex, could solve it in two main ways. One way was to form male coalitions in order to fight other men and monopolize access to women. This path required displaying their physical capacities in order to be avoided as enemies and to be preferred as allies. It required also to monitor other men’s performance of physical fitness in order to be able to distinguish those men who were physically fit and could be preferred as allies or be avoided as enemies. Another way to do so was to be selected by fathers as husbands for their daughters. This path required also to display physical fitness, as well as to monitor the fitness displays of other men in order to keep up with the competition.The evolutionary problem of gaining reproductive access to the opposite sex through these paths can be partially solved by the mind interpreting the engagement in athletic competitions with other.

The complete article

Menelaos Apostolou — The Evolution Institute

Image source

Indian PhD student thanks Canada university for early convocation


While reading about Precilla (Veigas) Dsouza’s PhD, I was instantly reminded of a famous couplet of Ghalib.

I have a thousand desires, all desires worth dying for
Though many of my desires were fulfilled, majority remained unfulfilled.

I am also so happy to leave a legacy for my daughter, Jadyn, to find the strength to achieve her own life goals. I hope I can inspire my fellow graduates to work hard, follow their dreams, and remember that life is short. In the end, all we have is one another. When you leave this life, your legacy is you as a person, the love you leave behind.

The complete write up

Image source

My son, the Columbine high school shooter: ‘a mother is supposed to know’


Sue Klebold - A Mother's Reckoning

I was hearing an NPR podcast on Forgiveness. Sue Klebold’s son Dylan and his friend were responsible for the Columbine massacre. Sue has been living with this tragedy for the last 18 years. In her book A Mother’s Reckoning, she talks about being judged as a bad parent, trying to find why her son did what he did and how has the 1999 incident affected her.

The most controversial element of the memoir, however, is what it asks readers to do with their notions of Dylan. At the time of the shooting, Sue Klebold worked in the same building as a parole office, and often felt alienated and frightened getting in the elevator with ex-convicts. After Columbine, she writes, “I felt that they were just like my son. That they were just people who, for some reason, had made an awful choice and were thrown into a terrible, despairing situation. When I hear about terrorists in the news, I think, ‘That’s somebody’s kid.’”

The complete article

Emma Brockes — The Guardian

Image source

The Untold Story of Magic Leap, the World’s Most Secretive Startup


102106687-magicleap-1910x1000

Have you heard of Magic Leap, one of the most secretive startup. Currently, they are looking at a valuation of $8bn. This is from Wiki – Magic Leap is a US startup company that is working on a head-mounted virtual retinal display which superimposes 3D computer-generated imagery over real world objects, by projecting a digital light field into the user’s eye,[1][2] involving technologies potentially suited to applications in augmented reality and computer vision. It is attempting to construct a light-field chip using silicon photonics.[3]

Magic Leap may fail. It may fail spectacularly, in the kind of blowup that makes for a great business tale. Or it may fail only in its ambition to be the Apple of augmented reality — and instead become yet another technology company powering devices and services that help Alibaba to better compete with Microsoft and Facebook. It’s also possible that it may succeed spectacularly.

The complete article – Backchannel

Detailed story in Wired

Image source