THE DARK SIDE OF IVORY PROHIBITION


Fire burns part of an estimated 105 tonnes of ivory and a tonne of rhino horn confiscated from smugglers and poachers at the Nairobi National Park near Nairobi

It is difficult to imagine what could be the dark side of bank on ivory.

Some might shrug off the loss of ivory artifacts as acceptable collateral damage in the war on poaching. But the existence of a vast amount of impeccably legal ivory in the form of bona fide historic carvings means that total prohibition of absolutely all commerce, even trade in culturally important antiquities, will never be completely accepted everywhere. Enacting such a sweeping no-exceptions ban could backfire badly. Many would view it as bureaucratic over-reach, encouraging disdain for regulation and stimulating the criminal ivory market — and the elephant poaching that makes it possible.

The complete article

John Frederick Walker — The Smart Set

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One thought on “THE DARK SIDE OF IVORY PROHIBITION

  1. Although it is long and articulate I tried to read the article that signals.
    I completely ignored the gravity of this situation.

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