IN SOLITUDE WHAT HAPPINESS?


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Have you ever felt an inexplicable sadness because you were alone? I felt such a sadness on a weekend when I was in London away from my family during Holi, one of the biggest festivals in India.

We live in a society that admires independence but derides isolation. Yet for many old people the two go hand in hand. Back in the summer of 1960, following the death of his wife, Joy, C.S. Lewis wrote of the agony of becoming a free agent. “I’d like to meet,” he wrote to Peter Bide, the priest who had married them, “for I am – Oh God that I were not – very free now. One doesn’t realise in early life that the price of freedom is loneliness. To be happy is to be tied.” This was exactly Barry’s experience. He finds it hard to say where grief ends and loneliness begins, but together he experienced them as “a penetrating hurt that doesn’t dissipate – a mental thing that becomes physical and robs you of all motivation. I got very near to losing the will to live: despair is always knocking on the door for the lonely.”

The complete article

Maggie Fergusson — 1843

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3 thoughts on “IN SOLITUDE WHAT HAPPINESS?

  1. I’ve been thinking along these lines lately. I prefer solitude. I crave it and need to be alone. Yet if I’m away from my husband too long, there’s something missing. We are able to be alone yet together with our books and our quiet life.

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